East Cleveland woman wants condemned house next door torn down

She says the house has been falling apart since a fire in February

East Cleveland woman wants condemned house next door torn down
An East Cleveland woman says the house next door is not only an eyesore, but dangerous. She wants the city to tear it down.

CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) - An East Cleveland woman says the house next door is more than a public nuisance. She thinks it’s dangerous, and she wants the city to tear it down.

This comes months after a fire destroyed a large portion of that house, leaving other sections falling off.

East Cleveland woman wants condemned house next door torn down

Tina Lemon says she has to face the problem every time she gets home.

“When I pull up, what else is falling, what else is going to happen?” said Lemon.

The house next door to her home on Rosalind Avenue caught on fire in February, according to neighbors. Since then, it’s been slowly falling apart in sections, says Lemon.

"When we got into May and June, and we started hearing this house, we could hear it actually move, you know, and things falling," she said. "Once we started hearing that, I got concerned."

Lemon called the city of East Cleveland, who came to inspect the house and officially declared it a public nuisance. Following a series of legal steps that make it eligible for demolition, including that declaration, the house remains standing. Lemon says she doesn’t understand why.

"This is not doing the City of East Cleveland any justice, when we have property like this sitting here," she said.

Tina Lemon says she's afraid to park her car in her driveway, due to falling debris from the other house.
Tina Lemon says she's afraid to park her car in her driveway, due to falling debris from the other house.

Cleveland 19 News talked to Melran Leach, Director of Building and Housing for East Cleveland. He says the house is on the list for demolition, but could not say when it would be torn down.

"It depends. For us, we don't do them one by one, because that would cost too much money. For us, we make sure we have enough demos that we're going to do with our funding to make sure that it makes sense," said Leach.

He says there's a large number of homes that need to come down, but the city needs to prioritize demolitions, based on what poses the largest risk.

"They all pose a risk, but some risks are greater than others," said Leach. "We have some where foundations are collapsing and falling in, but we have to do what we can."

Back on Rosalind Avenue, Tina Lemon says the house next door is a risk, not only to her, but her kids.

"I know there's housing on the list, and I understand they have a lot of abandoned houses they have to tend to, but this is something right next door to someone who lives here," she said.

The city posted a sign on the door, declaring this house a public nuisance in May. That's one step toward qualifying for demolition.
The city posted a sign on the door, declaring this house a public nuisance in May. That's one step toward qualifying for demolition.

Leach said more demolitions are being scheduled for late fall, and he added that the city can continue doing demolitions well into winter. Some of the demos they cannot fund may also be considered for county funding, he said.

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