Dimora Sentencing, Drought and Food Prices, Blood Shortage - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Dimora Sentencing, Drought and Food Prices, Blood Shortage

Jimmy Dimora Jimmy Dimora

Sentencing for Jimmy Dimora in now underway inside an Akron Federal Courtroom. Dimora is wearing an orange jumpsuit in Judge Sara Lioi's courtroom. He was brought into the courthouse in a wheelchair, but entered the courtroom using a walker. Dimora agreed to final forfeiture order, and it has been signed by Judge Lioi. Dimora was convicted of all but one of the nearly three dozen charges against him. Judge Lioi later overturned one of the convictions. Dimora still faces a long prison term. A federal sentencing guideline recommended punishment of up to life in prison. Dimora's lawyers are expected to spend much of their time arguing that the recommendation is far too severe. Attorneys for the government want Dimora to serve at least 22 years as a minimum prison term. This is the first time Dimora will be seen by the public since his conviction. He has not adjusted well in prison, according to 19 Action News sources. He also had a fall in prison and was hospitalized for a head injury for several days.

Extreme heat and drought conditions will soon begin to take its toll on consumers as food prices rise due to bad crops. Corn and other crops have withered and fallen victim to the high temperatures. Due to a low supply, prices are expected to shoot up. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said meat prices will also rise significantly. With the consumer price index for beef and veal expected to gain between 3.5 percent and 4 percent this year. Poultry, corn and soybean prices are also on the rise. Prices for eggs, cheese and milk are also expected to rise.

The American Red Cross is asking more blood donors to step up. The organization said blood donations are at the lowest level in 15 years. Red Cross officials said all blood types are needed, especially O-negative, O-positive, A-negative and B-negative. Officials tell USA Today summer is typically a slow time of year, but this year's extreme heat may be keeping donors away.


Julia Tullos, WOIO Assignment Manager

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