Excessive smart phone use linked to lower GPAs - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Excessive smart phone use linked to lower GPAs

A study at Kent State found the more students were using smart phones, the lower their grades were. (Source: WOIO) A study at Kent State found the more students were using smart phones, the lower their grades were. (Source: WOIO)
KENT, OH (WOIO) - Are smart phones making students not-so-smart? A study recently conducted at Kent State University revealed alarming results.
 
The conclusion they were able to draw: The more time students spent on their smart phones, the lower their GPA. Professors behind the study say they finally have the data to prove what they've been telling their students for years.
 
Many people, including students, are glued to their smart phones.

"I check Facebook religiously. I'm always on YouTube," said KSU student Sierra Walsh.

"While teaching lectures, you'll see pretty regularly, students staring down at their laps, at a glowing screen, while others are paying attention to what's going on," said KSU professor Dr. Jake Barkley.
 
He and Dr. Andrew Lepp conducted a study that found the more students were using smart phones, the lower their grades were. Those who used the phones an average of 10 hours a day had an average GPA of 2.84. Moderate users, averaged a 3.0 GPA. Those who used their smart phones 90 minutes or less averaged a 3.15 GPA.

Barkley says more frequent smart phone users aren't meeting an important threshold.

"That 3.0 GPA is important for academic honors, dean's lists, and usually, is the cut off for admission into graduate school," he explained.   

"They're not concerned with the material the professor is teaching. They're more concerned with what they have to put on Twitter or Facebook," said KSU student Joshua Wampler.
 
"I use my phone to procrastinate. If I'm doing homework, but I'm not that much into it, I'll start checking Facebook or something," said KSU student Paulina Verbest.

"If you put your phone away, there's some real evidence that these are a risk in the classroom. They're going to have a negative impact on your academic performance," said Dr. Lepp.

Lepp says there's a lesson here for parents, too.

"Teach your kids to study and to focus without that distractor on the table while you're studying," he suggested.


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