Writer with autism gives life lessons in new book - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Writer with autism gives life lessons in new book

With family support, Aaron Broadstreet wrote "Sound Bites: Life Lessons by a Boy Who Has Autism." (Source: WOIO) With family support, Aaron Broadstreet wrote "Sound Bites: Life Lessons by a Boy Who Has Autism." (Source: WOIO)
Aaron Broadstreet wasn't defeated by his disorder, and uses it to help others. (Source: WOIO) Aaron Broadstreet wasn't defeated by his disorder, and uses it to help others. (Source: WOIO)

A 24-year-old with Asperger's Syndrome wanted to help other kids who struggle with their autism. 

When Aaron Broadstreet was diagnosed at the age of 9, his mother, Taff Price, remembers how she felt. 

"There was a grieving that goes on when you first hear the diagnosis because you think of all the things that can never be, and then you turn it around and say, what can be?"

Broadstreet soon proved what could be wouldn't be stopped by his disorder. Instead, autism would help him to help others. 

"One day he said, 'Mom, I wish there was a way to write a book to help people,'" said Price. 

Broadstreet explained that he wanted to create a book in which he could share his experience of living with autism and give advice to others struggling with the disorder. 

"What if I could make a book to help other people cope with life lessons?" asked Broadstreet. 

With his mother's encouragement, Broadstreet wrote, Sound Bites: Life Lessons by a Boy Who Has Autism

"Hope. There are more good times than difficult times for us," reads an excerpt from his book.

Broadstreet travels with his mother and lectures on his book, along with deep breathing and relaxation techniques. Their next event is at the Mustard Seed Market in Solon on May 26 and 27 at 6:30 p.m. 

Price says the response has been great. 

"It will be packed with people wanting to meet Aaron. I started getting letters from people all around the world and it was people who didn't even have special needs," said Price. 

But what Broadstreet and his mother want this book to teach is that everyone has a gift they can share with others.

"I think people are special skilled, gifted and unique with autism," said Broadstreet. 

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