Tempers flare as Officer Michael Brelo's trial wraps up week 2 - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Tempers flare as Officer Michael Brelo's trial wraps up week 2

Experts analyze mounds of evidence during the trial. (Source: WOIO) Experts analyze mounds of evidence during the trial. (Source: WOIO)
Scientist says footprints on the Chevy Malibu matched Michael Brelo's shoes. (Source: WOIO) Scientist says footprints on the Chevy Malibu matched Michael Brelo's shoes. (Source: WOIO)
Prosecutor Timothy McGinty points towards the defense as he addresses the judge. (Source: WOIO) Prosecutor Timothy McGinty points towards the defense as he addresses the judge. (Source: WOIO)
Lead defense attorney Patrick D'Angelo listens as the argument between sides turns personal. (Source: WOIO) Lead defense attorney Patrick D'Angelo listens as the argument between sides turns personal. (Source: WOIO)
The second week has come to an end in the trial of Cleveland Police Officer Michael Brelo, who is charged with voluntary manslaughter after two citizens were killed after a police chase and shooting. 

On day 10, tempers flared over evidence prosecutors wanted to introduce that defense had not seen. 

It revealed the prosecutors' frustration with police. Prosecutor Timothy McGinty has called the lack of cooperation by police a "blue wall." 

"They knew what happened that night. Those 20 officers knew what was going on and they didn't tell Det. Holcomb. They didn't tell BCI. That's why we're going to these extremes," McGinty told Judge John O'Donnell.  

That triggered a response from defense attorney Patrick D'Angelo.

"There he goes again, your honor, misstating what the evidence is," D'Angelo said.

On a day of very routine testimony, the bad blood boiling beneath the surface between the two erupted. The argument turned personal.

"That's his attack mode. That's his game. That's been his game his whole life," McGinty said.  

"Yeah, my whole life. You've got a great reputation, too," D'Angelo countered. 

Personalities aside, a footprint expert testified that prints on the hood of the Chevy Malibu that Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams died in matched Officer Brelo's shoes. Brelo has said he does not remember jumping on the hood of the car and firing. 

The findings of BCI ballistics expert Michael Roberts were not as clear. While markings on ejected bullet casings can be identified to determine roughly from where they were fired, bullets from the glock weapons Cleveland Police use cannot be traced back to a specific gun. 

"I was not able to identify the pattern from test to test," said Roberts.

The fireworks were not the first of the trial, and likely will not be the last. 

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