Finding Help: Escalating violence can impact children

Finding Help: Escalating violence can impact children

Psychologist Dr. Deborah Koricke says children who are victims of violence or experience violence are the most vulnerable, which is why parents should watch for warning signs and encourage them to talk. 
 
"It's up to the parents to help them if something happens, or if their child worries it will happen, to get them the kind of help they may need," explains Dr. Koricke.
 
Koricke says you should ask your child how he or she is feeling. If your child has trouble expressing feelings, play therapy sessions, like drawing emotions or using a doll house to mimic situations.
 
"With younger kids, it's often that they're just very sad, but they may act due to regression, start acting in a way like they were much younger. Like maybe if they were 2 or 3 and fully potty trained, start wetting the bed again," Koricke describes.
 
The bottom line is don't ignore their feelings or let them mask them, because that could lead to trouble in the future.
 
"Unfortunately, if kids are older, they themselves are filled with a lot of anger and that's what you can see when kids are depressed or angry. They're going to be hostile and maybe aggressive to other kids," says Koricke.

Counseling can be an option. Ask your child's pediatrician for a referral, local hospital or insurance company. Parents should go to a session first before bringing their child.

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