Akron chickens may fly the coop - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Akron chickens may fly the coop

Akron man must move chicken coop (Source: WOIO) Akron man must move chicken coop (Source: WOIO)
Akron's chicken ordinance questioned by one resident (Source: WOIO) Akron's chicken ordinance questioned by one resident (Source: WOIO)
Chicken coops must be 100 feet away from any Akron dwelling (Source: WOIO) Chicken coops must be 100 feet away from any Akron dwelling (Source: WOIO)
Homeowner has one week to get rid of his chickens (Source: WOIO) Homeowner has one week to get rid of his chickens (Source: WOIO)
Akron homeowner challenging city's chicken ordinance (Source: WOIO) Akron homeowner challenging city's chicken ordinance (Source: WOIO)
AKRON, OH (WOIO) -

Backyard chickens are becoming a bigger and bigger trend.

Many people want to raise chickens so they can make sure their eggs are 100 percent organic.

But before you start counting your chickens you better know your city's rules.

For Kevin Myers of Akron, the idea of backyard chickens was a health choice.

"The biggest thing for us is going with the non-GMO, non-steroid, totally organic feed so that's exactly what they get fed," Myers said of his 26 hens, with no roosters for noise complaints. "They produce our eggs for us, they produce eggs for our family."

It does work.

"So on average we get between 15 and 26 eggs a day," Myers said.
 
This all started back in February with a phone call to a clerk with Akron Animal Control.

"She told us the only rule was that the coop had to be 100 feet away from neighboring dwellings. So that's what we did," said Myers.

In March, Myers put the coop next to his home and 100 feet from all neighbors. But he should have done a little more research.

The actual rule, Akron city ordinance 92.18, says it must be 100 feet from neighbors and your own home.

Somewhere there was a miscommunication.

When a neighbor turned Myers in a couple of weeks ago the city said the chickens must go for health reasons.

Myers said he learned his lesson.

"Go down get the actual ordinance in your hand. Try to figure out everything for yourself. Don't take nobody's word over the phone because that's what we did and this is where we ended up," he said.

Myers is left holding the bag... of chickens.

His total investment comes to between $500 and $1000.

He has a week to get rid of he chickens or face a court summons.

"They've been a part of our family we're going to try to fight it. We're going to go to court see what we can do. We're just not going to give up," said Myers.

He is hoping to fight and change Akron’s city laws. He’s started an online petition.

CLICK HERE for a link to that petition.

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