Who is Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty?

Who is Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty?

CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) - Despite his high conviction rate and experience with other high-profile cases, there have been numerous calls throughout the
Tamir Rice investigation, for Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Timothy McGinty to step aside.

Community leaders and activists, along with the Rice family, want an independent special prosecutor to take over the case.
They have concerns the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor's Office works too closely with the police department and, therefore, cannot be impartial.
 
The prosecutor at the center of the Tamir Rice case, Tim McGinty, is very familiar with our city and the issues that have lead up to this pivotal decision.
He has spent his life in Cleveland, graduating from St. Edward High School, then Heidelberg College and got a law degree from Cleveland State's John Marshall College of Law.

Right out of school, he was working in law enforcement as a probation officer.  McGinty was later hired by the late John T. Corrigan as an Assistant Prosecuting Attorney in Cuyahoga County. 

Over a 10-year span, he handled high-profile cases, like the 1989 prosecution of Ronnie Shelton, also known as the West Side Rapist.

McGinty earned the backing of the police community and was named the Ohio Prosecutor of the Year by the Ohio Patrolmen's Benevolent Association.

He served as a Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge for nearly two decades, then left the bench and was elected county prosecutor in 2012.

As prosecutor, he launched a DNA Cold Case Initiative Task Force and created the specialized Public Corruptions Unit.  He maintains a 99 percent conviction rate.

More recently, McGinty was the face of the prosecution of Cleveland Kidnapper, Ariel Castro.

Castro was sentenced to life, plus 1,000 years. Castro later died in prison.

McGinty took a lot of heat before and after the trial of Cleveland Officer Michael Brelo, accused in the city's infamous Deadly Police Chase.

Brelo was found not guilty in the shooting deaths of Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams.  Judge John O'Donnell ruled prosecutors failed to prove Brelo fired the fatal shots.

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