Romona's Kids: Students break unique language barrier - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Romona's Kids: St. Brendan students break unique language barrier

Romona's Kids: Students break unique language barrier

St. Brendan students learn American Sign Language (Source: WOIO) St. Brendan students learn American Sign Language (Source: WOIO)
St. Brendan students learn American Sign Language (Source: WOIO) St. Brendan students learn American Sign Language (Source: WOIO)
St. Brendan students learn American Sign Language (Source: WOIO) St. Brendan students learn American Sign Language (Source: WOIO)
NORTH OLMSTED, OH (WOIO) -

Most students take a foreign language class, even starting as early as grade school.

But St. Brendan School in North Olmsted is tackling a different language barrier by teaching kids American Sign Language.

The sign language club at St. Brendan has more than 50 students who stay after school to learn ASL.

Their teacher says sign language opens up a whole new world to the kids and helps them understand that there are people in the world who cannot hear. They also experience what it might be like to be deaf.

"I decided to take sign language because when I come across someone who’s deaf I know how to communicate with them and I would also like to start teaching sign language when I get older,” said fifth-grader Kate Hayes.

"I think it makes them feel really good because not many children know how to sign, and it's kind of cool to have a conversation with a kid," said sixth-grader Caleb Molseed "I really want to become an interpreter."

The club got so big, they had to split it into three sections. One of them even allows parents to join in, so it becomes a family affair.

"So we teach each other what signs we learned, it's really cool,” said fourth-grader Sarah Molseed.

"I'm teaching my mom everything that I learn in sign language in each class," said student Ava Kaminski.

"This year is my first year," said fifth-grader Adalynn Ginley. "Everybody was doing it and they were having so much fun doing it, so I joined to see how it would be and it’s a lot of fun."

"When one of my students tries to communicate with a deaf person, the deaf person generally will get very excited because somebody knows their language," said teacher Christie Kort.

"I love working with the kids, it's wonderful," said volunteer Char Jevnikar, who is deaf.

She even assigns sign names to students, usually something based on their personality.

The kids even sang and signed at the Christmas concert and Christmas Eve Mass. They will also perform this spring at the school’s Grandparents Day and 8th grade graduation.

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