Inside Look: Cleveland police cadets training in Columbus - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Inside Look: Cleveland police cadets training in Columbus

Cleveland police cadets take few breaks during training in Columbus. (Source: WOIO) Cleveland police cadets take few breaks during training in Columbus. (Source: WOIO)
The cadets train in simulated crime scenes collecting evidence. (Source: WOIO) The cadets train in simulated crime scenes collecting evidence. (Source: WOIO)
Finding evidence to make a link is a lot like connecting the dots, but it must be done properly to stand up at trial. (Source: WOIO) Finding evidence to make a link is a lot like connecting the dots, but it must be done properly to stand up at trial. (Source: WOIO)
COLUMBUS, OH (WOIO) -

It's a fabled story to be told about the brave and the bold.

In a controversial move, the Cleveland Police cadet class was sent to Columbus to do their training at the Ohio State Highway Patrol academy. The police union fought the move, only to lose the fight in court. 

Some cadets dropped out because being away for five days a week for several months was too much stress on their families. 

So how is the rest of the class doing? 

Out of the original 50 cadets, 43 remain. Some left voluntarily, others did not.

Strength, courage, character and attention to detail are just some of the OSHP's core values. Much of what they hope to create in a cadet is instilled by strict discipline. We didn't have a stopwatch, but lunch certainly didn't last longer than 10 minutes.

Lt. Dave Dillon is overseeing the training of the cadets and is impressed so far.

"As a group, as a team, they've embraced our core values. They've adapted very well," said Dillon. 

The Cleveland class just completed the first of three phases of training. No weapons are involved until advanced training in phase three. Phase two is basic police skills and is what cadets are working on now.

Cadets were training in a simulated crime scene collecting evidence. What they didn't know was that the evidence they were going to collect was related to evidence found in cars in other parts of the building.

After switching areas, they had to prove the connection. This is where the field applications of classroom lessons are learned. There are blood droplets, a knife, a credit card and other materials to be collected, catalogued, not to mention fingerprints to be lifted. 

"Basically, they've had to go in, identify the evidence at the crime scene. Now, they're processing it and once they've collected their evidence, they can start putting their case together," explained Trooper Jim Beysel, a certified evidence technician. 

The second half of the case involved a car believed to have been used in the simulated crime scenario. Finding evidence to make a link is a lot like connecting the dots, but it must be done properly to stand up at trial.

While not addressing the controversy over the class training in Columbus rather than Cleveland, Dillon does acknowledge going from civilian to police officer is challenging. For some, it's more of a shock than others. 

Shock or not, we're told the class is getting high marks as it marches toward graduation.

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