Five years after the Chardon School Shooting, schools are safer, - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Five years after the Chardon School Shooting, schools are safer, says teacher

Source: WOIO Source: WOIO
CHARDON, OH (WOIO) -

The Coach Hall Foundation will host a day-long school safety conference today to help schools learn how to keep their kids safe and prevent a tragedy like what happened at Chardon High School, five years ago today.

Three students were killed and three others were injured when T.J. Lane opened fire in the school lunchroom at Chardon High School on February 27, 2012.

"It is something that most of us in the building have thought of every day of our lives since then," said Tim Armelli, a teacher for 20 years at Chardon High School.

Armelli is also the president of The Coach Hall Foundation, a foundation that was formed after the shooting. Armelli helped to organize today's event that will take place at Mentor High School. He says today he feels that schools are safer and that the Chardon community, in general, is much closer after the horrific events at his school.

"We've found through the years now that there is more than one type of protection our kids need. It's not just physical harm, but it's social alienation. It's psychological abuse, and we just want layered, different types of protection to make sure our kids come home every - that they come home happy and healthy, and eager to learn," said Armelli.

This is a still a tough time of the year for many of those who were at the school the day of the shooting.

"It is a tough day. I mean February starts rolling around. It stirs up a lot of emotions. It was one of the most tragic days that you can imagine living through, but because of that, you either let the evil that was present that day eat you alive or you move forward and try to promote health and attitude, and continue living, and in honor of those that we have lost, we have taken the latter," added Armelli.

Armelli says that today's safety conference will offer a multi-layered approach to keeping kids safe.

There have been many physical changes in school safety systems like door suppression systems, better locking devices anch school resource officers are better trained at promoting positive relationships.

Students are also safer when they are taught to be a part of the process.

"How to promote positive relationships. We have changed the cultural attitude... Letting kids know how to be more kind and compassionate, how to recognize danger zones in their friends and peers so that they become part of the solution," said Armelli.

One hundred and twenty people are participating in today's safety conference, including representatives from Sandy Hook Elementary School and Virginia Tech - two schools that also suffered through their own school shooting tragedies.

The Coach Hall Foundation will host a day-long school safety conference today to help schools learn how to keep their kids safe and prevent a tragedy like what happened at Chardon High School, five years ago today.

Three students were killed and three others were injured when T.J. Lane opened fire in the school lunchroom at Chardon High School on February 27, 2012.

"It is something that most of us in the building have thought of every day of our lives since then," said Tim Armelli, a teacher for 20 years at Chardon High School.

Armelli is also the president of The Coach Hall Foundation, a foundation that was formed after the shooting. Armelli helped to organize today's event that will take place at Mentor High School. He says today he feels that schools are safer and that the Chardon community, in general, is much closer after the horrific events at his school.


"We've found through the years now that there is more than one type of protection our kids need. It's not just physical harm, but it's social alienation. It's psychological abuse, and we just want layered, different types of protection to make sure our kids come home every - that they come home happy and healthy, and eager to learn," said Armelli.

This is a still a tough time of the year for many of those who were at the school the day of the shooting.

"It is a tough day. I mean February starts rolling around. It stirs up a lot of emotions. It was one of the most tragic days that you can imagine living through, but because of that, you either let the evil that was present that day eat you alive or you move forward and try to promote health and attitude, and continue living, and in honor of those that we have lost, we have taken the latter," added Armelli.

Armelli says that today's safety conference will offer a multi-layered approach to keeping kids safe.

There have been many physical changes in school safety systems like door suppression systems, better locking devices anch school resource officers are better trained at promoting positive relationships.

Students are also safer when they are taught to be a part of the process.

"How to promote positive relationships. We have changed the cultural attitude... Letting kids know how to be more kind and compassionate, how to recognize danger zones in their friends and peers so that they become part of the solution," said Armelli.

One hundred and twenty people are participating in today's safety conference, including representatives from Sandy Hook Promise and Virginia Tech - two schools that also suffered through their own school shooting tragedies.

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