What the Chinese markings say on the counterfeit bills circulating in Northeast Ohio

What the Chinese markings say on the counterfeit bills circulating in Northeast Ohio

Dr. Tony Chen, a professor at Baldwin Wallace University, was able to translate the obvious markings on the left side of the bill.

These are bills used by banks in China to train employees, Chen said.

"Basically, those aren't the real bills. They are just samples used by the trainees, particularly those new hires by a bank, when they practice counting money manually and for that purpose only," said Chen. "It should stay out of circulation and certainly cannot be used as real money."

Here's a rough translation:

Lt. Toby Burgett with the Painesville police department said they've found three such bills passed at two businesses.

One was a liquor store and the other was at a gas station.

Burgett called it novelty money, or motion picture money, used on movie sets. He encouraged businesses to use the counterfeit bill detecting pens because these bills will not pass that test.

This translated article shows this has been a problem in Australia in which they are called "practice coupons" or "training banknotes" and were also used in stores passed as $100.

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