Dayton native was returning to work on Wall Street as act of ter - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Dayton native was returning to work on Wall Street as act of terror unfolded

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NEW YORK (FOX19) -

Gail Danneman is from Dayton, Ohio. She currently works for Walgreens in New York City's Financial District.

More specifically, she works in the Trump building on Wall Street, which means she was just a few blocks away from Tuesday's terror attack in Lower Manhattan. Eight people are dead and several more are seriously injured as a result of the attack, in which a man drove a truck the wrong way down a bike path, deliberately mowing down cyclists.

"I was actually out in Walgreens stores at the time that it happened, and I didn't even know that it had happened, so I was en route back to our Wall Street office," Danneman said. "It was actually my father-in-law who sent a text asking if I was OK -- that was my first hearing about the incident."

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She said when she got to the offices, things were frantic.

"People in that area have a very strong sense of what happened on 9/11, and there was just a lot of people very afraid, running around, you could just sense that fear in everyone," she said.

She said her mind went to the worst possible scenario.

"My husband and I have real conversations about what would happen in this kind of situation because of where I work, and the area, and my first reaction was to text him and let him know I was fine. Because no matter where I am in the city I always kind of let him know. But then you start to wonder what else is going to happen."

Danneman said she plans to run the NYC Marathon this weekend.

"I was running in Central Park this evening and it was so bizarre -- I ran past the finish line and the first thought I had was, 'It could happen here on Sunday.' There's definitely a lot of NYPD presence, there always is, but I noticed it on the subway coming home," she said.

Danneman said she felt an anxiety in the city Tuesday night about what else could happen, but added the city knows how to pull together.

"When something like this happens, the city comes together in a way that is unlike anything I've seen, and people genuinely do care for each other," she said.

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