Did you know heat stroke in dogs can fry their brain like an egg - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Did you know heat stroke in dogs can fry their brain like an egg?

Watch out for heat exhaustion in your pets this weekend in the hot weather. (Source: Pixabay) Watch out for heat exhaustion in your pets this weekend in the hot weather. (Source: Pixabay)
CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) -

This weekend will be another hot one with temperatures breaking 90, which isn't just hot for you but your pets as well.

Last week, Cleveland 19 Reporter Dan DeRoos was asked in an email about pets and heat exhaustion. 

Dan,

Can someone do a story on the signs of heat exhaustion in pets. One of my dogs came in from the heat totally overheated.  He was out only 5 minutes but he was running around because fireworks were going off. I didn't know what to do for him. He went in front of one of my fans and just laid there.  He is fine. But it got me thinking. I went online and looked at all the signs. Maybe people don't have the resources like I do. Thank you

Sherry 

The answer, according to Dr. Rhonda Smith, with Sandstone Animal Hospital in Berea and Emerald Animal Hospital in Cleveland, is yes: dogs are very susceptible to heat stroke. 

All of that fur is great for cold Cleveland winters but can be a huge problem in our summers, causing heat exhaustion, or what's known as hyperthermia. 

"Fairly common in the summertime. More common in older dogs or dogs with smooshed faces (brachycephalic) like pugs and bulldogs," Dr. Smith said. 

What to look for:

While people sweat, dogs pant. 

Too much panting, though, should be your first sign. 

"Excessive Panting, drooling, lethargy, pet is hot too touch, rectal temp greater than 102.5 degrees, lying down without wanting to walk or lift head, or collapse," Dr. Smith advised. 

If you don't get your dog help, the consequences are tough to think about. 

"The brain fries irreversibly like an egg," Dr. Smith said. "The pet may have a seizure and then death ensues. Just like a baby accidentally left in a car."

What to do:

The first thing to do is the obvious, which is to remove the dog from the hot situation. 

Either get them out of a car, if they were left, or get them inside if they were left outside.

"Offer water orally only if patient is able to lift head and swallow," Dr. Smith said. 

Another option is to get them into a cool bath tub or hose them down with cool water.

"Do not put patient in ice bath. Cooling too quickly makes vessels on surface constrict and traps heat inside more," according to Dr. Smith. 

You may also want to get the dog to your local pet clinic so it can receive fluid through and IV. 

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