Perseid meteor shower in Northeast Ohio this weekend should be c - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Perseid meteor shower in Northeast Ohio this weekend should be called meteor dribble, here's why

A bright Perseid meteor streaked down on August 7, 2010, over buildings at the Stellafane amateur astronomy convention in Springfield, Vermont. (Source: Sky & Telescope / Dennis di Cicco) A bright Perseid meteor streaked down on August 7, 2010, over buildings at the Stellafane amateur astronomy convention in Springfield, Vermont. (Source: Sky & Telescope / Dennis di Cicco)
The Perseid meteors appear to stream away from the shower's "radiant" point near the border of Perseus and Cassiopeia. (Source: Sky & Telescope) The Perseid meteors appear to stream away from the shower's "radiant" point near the border of Perseus and Cassiopeia. (Source: Sky & Telescope)
CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) -

If the conditions are right, and your in a dark enough space, it's possible to see as many as 60 meteors in an hour this weekend during the Perseid meteor shower. 

Doing the math that's about one "shooting star" per minute if you catch it. 

You will be helped out by the fact there is no bright moon shining this weekend, hampering your view. 

"Meteor showers should be called, meteor dribbles," Jay Reynolds said who is a Research Astronomer with Cleveland State University. "If you live in urban areas, Cleveland, Lakewood, perhaps a couple per hour. Very dark areas, 60 per hour.  Also depends on clear skies, haze, dust and most importantly, lights. Less is better."

The peak will be Sunday night Aug. 12 running through the morning of Aug. 13. 

The best time will be 2 a.m. on Monday morning. 

So what is burning up that makes it look like a "shooting star?"

"They are actually bits of space debris from a comet," according to Reynolds. "The debris is smaller than a fleck of pepper or mustard seed. A grain of sand would be considered large. What makes it burn, is it's speed as it hits Earth's atmosphere. They burn up about 60 miles above us."

Reynolds said it would be extremely rare that one ever makes it all the way to the ground. 

"No one to our knowledge, has ever been killed by a meteor. Injured, but not killed," said Reynolds. 

As for where to look, "At 9:30, just look up," Reynolds said. "Midnight, start looking a little more towards the east. 2 a.m., look Northeast."

Below is a chart from Sky & Telescope showing you the best direction to look to. 

The meteors will radiate from the Perseid constellation.

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