Scamming Psychic Sentenced To Jail Time - Cleveland 19 News Cleveland, OH

Scamming Psychic Sentenced To Jail Time

CLEVELAND – The Investigator Tom Meyer used a hidden camera to expose the scam, and he got results when a con artist was sentenced to more than four years behind bars.

Steve and Sandy Miller cautiously entered a courtroom to face eight victims that they hadn't seen since the couple ripped them off for more than $33,000. The victims urged judge William Coyne to send the phony fortunetellers to prison.

"Because of this woman, my credit has been ruined," victim Deborah Delvalle said. "The Millers have no redeeming qualities, and the Millers need to be punished for their crimes."

The Millers preyed on people who were at a vulnerable time in their lives. A victim named "Bethany" got bilked out of $1,000.

"She took this money in the name of the church, saying it was going to be blessed," Bethany said.

The victims, who range from 19 to 71 years old, include Ruby White, who was scammed for more than $15,000.

A woman with a doctorate degree, who 19/43 News followed with a hidden camera, got taken for $2,000, and then was verbally abused when she demanded that Sandy Miller return her money.

The Millers showed no remorse when The Investigator confronted them on Friday before they went into court. The con game continued as Steve Miller showed up in a wheelchair before the judge.

"For Mr. Miller to come off the elevator, walk under his own power, wait for the elevator, go back downstairs and now come up in a wheelchair, I don't feel they're remorseful for what they've done to me or the other victims," Delvalle said.

Both of the Millers apologized in court. The judge was not impressed, and sentenced Sandy Miller to nearly five years in prison. Her husband was sentenced to probation.

"You're a con artist," Coyne told Sandy Miller. "The only reason you are sorry is that you were caught."

Steve Miller is in poor health, and that's the only reason that he's not going to prison with his wife. He promised the judge that he and his wife would never get back into the business of fortune telling. But then, he's also the person who told The Investigator that the hearing was postponed in the hopes that he would not cover it.

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