NRA-certified instructor indicted for selling fraudulent CCW certificates following Carl Monday investigation

NRA-certified instructor indicted for selling fraudulent CCW certificates following Carl Monday investigation
Anthony Drago appearing via video at his arraignment Monday morning (Source: Devin Lamb)

CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) - A Portage County business owner and NRA certified instructor has been indicted for selling fraudulent firearms certificates following a Carl Monday investigation.

NRA-certified instructor indicted for selling fraudulent CCW certificates following investigation

Anthony Drago is facing 12 felony charges, including four counts of tampering with records, four counts of falsification to obtain a concealed handgun license, and four counts of forgery. A grand jury returned the secret indictment against Drago in November. It wasn’t unsealed until Dec. 3.

Drago was arraigned in Portage County Common Pleas Court Monday morning, where he pleaded not guilty to all charges. Bond was set at $20,000.

Before anyone can carry a concealed weapon in Ohio, they are required to undergo mandatory firearms training, like the courses offered by the National Rifle Association.

But last spring, we interviewed three people who claim they each paid Drago $100 and in exchange received the documentation required to obtain a CCW permit in Ohio.

They all say Drago did not make them complete the eight hours of instructional gun training as required by law, including the minimum two hours of in-person range time and live-fire training.

One woman who paid Drago says despite the fact she never took a firearms safety course or even fired a weapon, the instructor gave her a signed, official NRA Basic Pistol Course Certificate of Completion, which she then used to obtain a CCW permit through the Portage County Sheriff’s Office.

As a condition of his bond, Drago has been ordered not to teach any CCW classes while his case is pending.

Copyright 2018 WOIO. All rights reserved.

RELATED CONTENT

Thousands without power as high winds blow through Northern Ohio

  Cleveland Police find two missing children Saturday evening

  Fire guts Glenville home but also displaces residents on either side

Winter is the peak season for fires with people using space heaters and even candles to heat home, electrical overloads and sealed up houses making them more combustible with higher carbon monoxide readings.