3 Cleveland-born baseball players helped build American League

3 Cleveland-born baseball players helped build American League
National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee (Source: Wikipedia)

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - Not only is there a lot of All Star history here in Cleveland, (hosting six times) there are a handful of Hall of Fame Inductees born in the Cleveland area who contributed to the history of the game.

Ed “Big Ed” Delahanty was born here in Cleveland in 1867. He was baseball’s defining slugger in the late 19th century, batting above .400 three times in his sixteen years in the league.

He indirectly helped boost Cleveland baseball. When Nap Lajoie found out that Ed was being paid more than him, Lajoie got upset at the Phillies ownership and eventually jumped ship here to Cleveland, giving them a superstar and adding legitimacy to the new American League club in 1902.

National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee
National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee (Source: Wikipedia)

He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, in 1945. Delahanty died falling into the Niagara River or Niagara Falls, after being kicked off a train while intoxicated. His suitcase from that trip was recently auctioned off for $19,000. He lived on East 34th, and most of his family is buried here.

Rube Marquard was born in Cleveland in 1886. He was a pitcher who played most of his career with the New York Giants and was elected into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

According to his obituary: “He got his start playing on the sandlots in the W. 46th Street and Clark Ave neighborhood on the city’s near West Side.”

National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee
National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee (Source: Wikipedia)

Rube Marquard is considered by baseball writer and historian, Bill James, to be the worst starting pitcher in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. He was arrested trying to scalp tickets to the 1920 World Series.

His family home is still over on West 46th street.

Elmer Flick-born in Bedford, Ohio in 1876. He went to high school there, too.

National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee
National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee (Source: Bedford Historical Society)

He played for the Cleveland Naps and ranks 3rd in franchise history for triples, 6th in stolen bases. According to the Indians, the Tigers supposedly offered to trade Ty Cobb to Cleveland for Flick but the Indians said no. He was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1963.

Flick was a member of the Bedford Fire Company No. 1 in the late 1800s through the early 1900s.

There's a bronze statue of him in the Bedford Commons.

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