Cleveland mayor’s grandson named as ‘prime suspect’ in West Side murder case; police not planning to hand over investigation to another agency

Cleveland mayor’s grandson named as ‘prime suspect’ in West Side murder case

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - The Cuyahoga County Prosecutor’s Office confirmed Tuesday that Mayor Frank Jackson’s grandson, Frank Q. Jackson, is a "prime suspect” in a murder that unfolded on the city’s West Side late last month.

Until now, 19 News had only confirmed that Jackson’s vehicle was towed from the mayor’s home as evidence in the murder case.

Now, prosecutors and some city council members want the police to hand over the investigation to an independent organization.

Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Michael O’Malley says Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams would be the one to bring in another agency to investigate the homicide that happened on Clark Avenue outside First Class Barber Shop in August.

“It is their decision to make,” he said. “We have actual video of the crime. It was an execution on Clark Avenue in broad daylight. It’s a very brutal homicide."

Antonio Parra, 30, of Warrensville Heights, was standing outside the barber shop when he was shot multiple times. Parra died on scene.

He says investigators believe the mayor’s grandson may have been involved in the murder.

It’s a message that’s very different from the one Frank Q Jackson’s attorney gave 19 News the week of the crime.

She said, “Frank Jackson has absolutely no involvement in this homicide.”

However, O’ Malley said, “His vehicle was observed fleeing with the suspected shooters after the shooting. So, certainly he remains a prime suspect.”

The mayor has been accused of intervening on his family member’s behalf in the past.

For that reason, O’Malley says it’d just be best to remove any conflict of interest in the case.

“I think it just makes it very difficult in this situation to investigate a member of his family when ultimately he’s your boss,” he said.

However, when we asked the police department if the chief is considering calling in another agency, a spokesperson said there were currently no plans to do so.

“I know they want to solve that crime, but in end, if we don’t solve it there will be questions asked at the end, and they will be very difficult to answer,” O’Malley said.

Copyright 2019 WOIO. All rights reserved.