Invasive spotted lanternfly may descend on Ohio this spring, and that’s not good

Spotted lantern fly eggs found in Pennsylvania just 15 miles from Ohio border.

Invasive spotted lanternfly may descend on Ohio this spring, and that’s not good
Spotted Lanternfly

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - It is what Ohio wildlife and agriculture officials have feared ever since the spotted lanternfly started destroying trees and fruit crops in Pennsylvania since 2014.

Invasive spotted lanternfly looks destined to invade Ohio this spring, and that’s not good

It’s only a matter of time that the invasive bug, that probably came over by shipping vessel from Asia, will be in Ohio.

This fall, after the insects had died, eggs were found at a rail yard in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, 15 miles from the Ohio border.

Eggs of the invasive spotted lantern fly were found this fall in Beaver County, Pennsylvania. Beaver County is just to the northeast of Pittsburgh, and borders the state of Ohio.
Eggs of the invasive spotted lantern fly were found this fall in Beaver County, Pennsylvania. Beaver County is just to the northeast of Pittsburgh, and borders the state of Ohio. (Source: Google)

The eggs were collected and destroyed and the area will be treated this spring with pesticides.

“It doesn’t bite or cause any known medical threat to people or pets, but it is becoming a major concern for the damage it does to the plants it feeds on,” according to Gavin Svenson with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

The bugs feed on trees, especially fruit trees, and can starve and kill them.

While they don’t bite or pose a threat to pets, they do leave behind a black soot-like mold on surfaces and homes.

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