New MetroHealth model predicts spike, then decrease of coronavirus cases as Ohio reopens

New MetroHealth model predicts spike, then decrease of coronavirus cases as Ohio reopens
MetroHealth Cuyahoga County reopening projections (Source: MetroHealth)

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - A new MetroHealth model is projecting what coronavirus cases in the Buckeye state could look like during June.

MetroHealth Cuyahoga County reopening projections
MetroHealth Cuyahoga County reopening projections (Source: MetroHealth)

According to MetroHealth, the model predicts an increase in coronavirus cases in Cuyahoga County and across the state in late May and into early June.

MetroHealth Cuyahoga County reopening projections
MetroHealth Cuyahoga County reopening projections (Source: MetroHealth)

Still, it also predicts a decrease in the number of cases in late June.

MetroHealth coronavirus Ohio reopening prediction
MetroHealth coronavirus Ohio reopening prediction (Source: MetroHealth)

The prediction is based on Ohioans coming into contact with each other as the state begins to reopen.

MetroHealth Ohio reopening coronavirus predictions
MetroHealth Ohio reopening coronavirus predictions (Source: MetroHealth)

According to MetroHealth, hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and deaths are trending lower over the past 21 days in Ohio.

MetroHealth physicians and public health officials studied clusters of infection involving people who have attended funerals, after religious celebrations, in nursing homes, the Cuyahoga County Jail, and confined workspaces.

With the gradual reopening of bars, restaurants, and other businesses in the process, the revised modeling predicts an increase in clusters of infection throughout May. Infections are likely to spike but gradually decrease throughout June, according to the modeling.

With more people in close contact state officials believe that testing is a key part of stopping the virus from spreading.

Right now Ohio is the fifth-worst state in the country in tests per person.

The state is testing around 9,000 people a day.

Problems with distribution and materials are keeping Ohio from testing at its full capacity of around 22,000 people every single day.

Governor DeWine says his team is working hard to push those levels even higher.

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