CARES Act funding could help cities pay cost of enforcing extended curfews, but many are still waiting on the money to come down from the state

CARES Act funding could help cities pay cost of enforcing extended curfews, but many are still waiting on the money to come down from the state
Senator Rob Portman says the manpower needed to enforce the ordinances is costing governments already hurting financially. (Source: WOIO)

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - It’s going to cost cities to enforce more extended curfews.

CARES Act funding could help cities pay cost of enforcing curfews, but there are complications

Sen. Rob Portman says the manpower needed to enforce the ordinances is costing governments already hurting financially.

“They are having a really hard time meeting one of the basic responsibilities, which is public safety,” he said.

Portman says the pandemic has caused widespread problems for municipalities like Cleveland that depend on income tax revenue to operate.

At the end of April, Mayor Frank Jackson said Cleveland was down about $12 million in expected income tax.

“I’ve spoken to Mayor Jackson about this,” Portman said. “I’ve spoken to the other mayors about it.”

Tuesday, 19 News investigators discovered that cities, especially the city of Cleveland, should be able to use funding from the recently passed CARES Act to pay law enforcement officers working overtime.

The CARES Act passed in March provided money for municipalities with a population of at least half a million people.

But in Ohio, only one city and five counties meet that criteria.

Smaller cities like Cleveland are still waiting on the state to disperse their portions.

“The rest of it was supposed to go to the state and then be sent down to the local communities, and that’s not happened,” Portman said.

No one seems to know when it will happen, leaving lingering concerns as tensions rise.

19 News is still working with police to determine how many people have been taken into custody in the last four days for violating the curfew.