Can an Ohio resident register for the COVID-19 vaccine in a bordering state?

Can an Ohio resident register for the COVID-19 vaccine in a bordering state?
(Source: kltv)

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - More Ohioans who meet certain criteria or conditions are now eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, but supply remains limited throughout the state.

The most recent group of individuals to become qualified for the vaccine joins other Ohioans who are 65 years or older, front-line responders and health care workers, and others who can receive the immunizations.

But what about the vaccine rollout strategy in Ohio’s neighboring states?

And can Ohioans travel across state lines to receive the vaccine? Ohio does allow out-of-state residents to receive the vaccine if eligibility requirements are met.


Pennsylvania

Health care workers, long-term care facility residents, individuals who are 65 years or older, and adults with high-risk medical conditions are currently eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Pennsylvania vaccine rollout
Pennsylvania vaccine rollout (Source: Pennsylvania Health Department)

The state will then proceed to provide the vaccine to groups of people including individuals in congregate care settings, first responders, correctional officers, grocery store or public transit workers, and teachers.

Pennsylvania vaccine rollout
Pennsylvania vaccine rollout (Source: Pennsylvania Health Department)

According to 19 News’ CBS affiliate, Pennsylvania does not prohibit out-of-state residents from receiving the COVID-19 vaccine if eligibility requirements are met.


West Virginia

Individuals who are 65 years or older, as well as health care workers and first responders are currently eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, according to the West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources.

Beginning in March, the state’s health department intends on then beginning to vaccinate the general public.

West Virginia vaccine rollout
West Virginia vaccine rollout (Source: West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources)

As of Feb. 15, the rollout strategy focused on state residents and those essential employees who work in West Virginia, regardless of where they reside, according to the health department’s website.


Kentucky

The first two phases of Kentucky’s vaccine rollout makes health care workers, residents of long-term care facilities, school faculty members, first responders, and anyone who is 70 years and older currently eligible for the vaccine.

Depending on vaccine supply, individuals who are at least 60 years old, those with high-risk health conditions, and essential workers could be scheduled for immunization appointments.

The Kentucky Public Health Department said the vaccine will be provided to those who can prove state residency or to an out-of-state resident that provides health care in Kentucky, but 19 News affiliate WAVE 3 News said there are no restrictions from non-residents getting vaccinated. In fact, WAVE 3 News received reports of out-of-state residents receiving the vaccine.


Indiana

People who are 65 years and older, health care workers, long-time care facility residents, congregate living facility employees, and emergency responders are currently allowed to be vaccinated under Indiana’s first phases of the vaccine rollout.

Indiana’s health department said registration to receive the COVID-19 vaccine is open to state residents, but WAVE 3 News acknowledged reports that some out-of-state individuals did travel to the Hoosier State for the coronavirus immunization.


Michigan has opened eligibility to people who are 65 years and older, as well as to health care workers, teachers and school staff, child care employees, police, and some prison laborers.

The state’s goal is to vaccinate 70% of people age 16 years and older by the end of 2021.

Michigan vaccine strategy
Michigan vaccine strategy (Source: Michigan Department of Health & Human Services)

There are no residency requirements in the state of Michigan, according to the Cincinnati Enquirer.


While several of Ohio’s neighboring states seemingly allow “vaccine tourists,” out-of-state residents could cause problems with supply because dose allotment tends to be based on population.

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