University Hospitals doctor says more research needs to be done to determine if Johnson and Johnson Vaccine causes blood clots

University Hospitals doctor says more research needs to be done to determine if Johnson and Johnson Vaccine causes blood clots
University Hospitals doctor discuses connection between Johnson and Johnson vaccine and blood clots. (Source: WOIO)

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - It’s the one-and-done vaccine.

Many people were relieved that the Johnson and Johnson Vaccine required only one shot in the arm.

Now, that vaccine is causing more questions than relief since six patients developed blood clots after getting the shot.

“There have only been six patients who have had it, we’re going to need to get a little more data first,” said Dr. Amy Edwards, Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist, UH Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Edwards has been one of the top experts we have depended on to inform us about COVID-19.

She says it’s hard to tell if the vaccine is actually causing blood clots since only six out of 6 million people have gotten blood clots after getting the vaccine.

“I think it’s very clear that the shot’s not causing the blood clots.... the question is is the shot contributing to it?” Dr. Edwards added.

To be on the safe side of things, Dr. Edwards is advising people with a history of blood clots to get the other two vaccines that are available.

“It was very unclear in the study because there were so few people but there were a couple of people who had blood clots in the original vaccine study, so for that reason, I had from the beginning been telling people who had a risk of blood clots to go with Pfizer or Moderna,” said Dr. Edwards.

If you have gotten the vaccine in the past two weeks, Dr. Edwards recommends calling a doctor immediately if you have any of these symptoms which are signs of blood clots.

“Rapid-onset headache, severe leg pain or swelling, and onset shortness of breath,” said Dr. Edwards.

We’re sure many of you are wondering if you should get any of the COVID vaccines that are out now.

Dr. Edwards says you should still get vaccinated so you can lower your risk of getting COVID.

“We’ve always known that there was a risk, some rare complication that we didn’t know that could pop up when you roll it out to millions of people,” said Dr. Edwards. “But dealing with a virus of this severity, the benefits far outweigh the risks,”

Copyright 2021 WOIO. All rights reserved.