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Cleveland police investigation continues after landlord was shot at Collinwood home

911 call reveals some confusion after shooting.
Investigation continues after Collinwood woman shoots her landlord who was breaking down the...
Investigation continues after Collinwood woman shoots her landlord who was breaking down the door to her apartment.(Source: 19 News)
Published: Sep. 2, 2021 at 3:08 PM EDT
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CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - Cleveland police continue to investigate a shooting from early August in the city’s Collinwood neighborhood after a woman shot her landlord because he allegedly attempted to break into the downstairs apartment.

“My neighbor next door, upstairs, was high on drugs, and he was banging on the door and he ended up kicking the door in and I shot,” the woman said during the 911 call.

The 911 dispatcher must not have picked up that the caller said she had fired her weapon because for three minutes the call goes on without an ambulance being sent and the dispatcher trying to learn the status of the man who had been shot.

The woman who fired the gun never again mentions that she had shot anyone and the situation is not cleared up until the boyfriend of the woman comes home and finishes the call with 911.

He tells the dispatcher that the man is not breathing.

“So he needs an ambulance?,” the dispatcher asks.

“He’s dead,” the man answers.

“So how did he die,” the dispatcher asks.

“He kicked in our door and she shot him,” he answers.

At that point, the dispatcher makes it clear that she had never heard the woman say that she had shot the man.

The case continues to be investigated by Cleveland Police.

Michael Benza is senior instructor of law at the Case Western Reserve University School of Law. He said Ohio has strong laws in favor of those protecting their homes.

“If you take just the basic facts, someone’s trying to come into this house, she doesn’t know who it is, she is inside the house, she shoots him. That is classic Castle Doctrine, protect your home self defense,” Benza said.

But these cases, Benza added, are rarely very simple.

“Where it gets complicated is if you have additional facts that say she knows this person, that is coming into the house,” he said.

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