Advertisement

Fire Prevention Week looks to save lives

Parma Fire Department provides tips on how to prepare for the unexpected.
Published: Oct. 6, 2021 at 4:54 PM EDT|Updated: Oct. 6, 2021 at 10:22 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - The first week of October is “Fire Prevention Week” which looks to educate the public about simple fire safety tips that could save lives.

According to recent data compiled by the US Fire Administration, since October of 2020, Ohio ranked fourth in the nation in fire related deaths with 124. The American Red Cross says fall and winter see the most fires, with December and January being the most dangerous. Parma Fire Department Public Information Officer T.J. Martin believes that is the case as many outdoor activities come inside. He said many people decide to light more candles and use their chimneys, often without thinking about what could go wrong if left alone.

“Average people believe that they’re doing the right thing and nine times out of ten they are, but it’s that one simple instance where something goes wrong, or what you didn’t think was going to go wrong is going to go wrong,” Officer Martin said, “They’re called accidents for a reason because they aren’t meant to happen.”

That’s why Officer Martin believes it’s important to check your smoke and carbon dioxide detectors, review exit drills from your home, get the furnace inspected, and to make sure any elderly people in your life are monitored, among other things.

Below are a few tips from the State Fire Marshal’s Office on what can be done to make sure all alarms are in good shape.

SMOKE ALARMS:

  • A continuous set of three loud beeps—beep, beep, beep—means smoke or fire. Get out, call 9-1-1, and stay out.
  • A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be changed.
  • All smoke alarms must be replaced after 10 years.
  • Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means the alarm is at the end of its life and the unit must be replaced.

CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) ALARMS:

  • A continuous set of four loud beeps—beep, beep, beep, beep—means carbon monoxide is present in your home. Go outside, call 9-1-1 and stay out.
  • A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be replaced.
  • CO alarms also have “end of life” sounds that vary by manufacturer. This means it’s time to get a new CO alarm.
  • Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means the alarm is at the end of its life and must be replaced.

Copyright 2021 WOIO. All rights reserved.